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Volume 8, Issue 2, April 2020, Page: 43-47
Preventive Effect of Electrical Stimulation Biofeedback Combined With Family Individualized Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation Training on Postpartum Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
Huan Wang, Outpatient Office of Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Hong Zhou, Outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Li Cheng, Outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Received: Feb. 1, 2020;       Accepted: Feb. 17, 2020;       Published: Mar. 6, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.js.20200802.11      View  470      Downloads  229
Abstract
Objective: To explore the preventive effect of electrical stimulation biofeedback combined with family individualized pelvic floor rehabilitation training on postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). Methods: From June 2018 to June 2019, 124 women who underwent the first postpartum review (Postpartum4-6 weeks, lochia clean, no vaginal bleeding) in our hospital were randomly divided into observation group and control group, 62 cases in each group. The control group received routine pelvic floor muscle training intervention, while the observation group received family individualized pelvic floor rehabilitation training combined with electrical stimulation biofeedback intervention. Six months after the intervention, the pelvic floor muscular fibre strength and A3 reflex, pelvic organ prolapse quantitative (POP-Q) score, pelvic floor dysfunction questionnaire (PFDI20), pelvic floor disease quality of life questionnaire (PFIQ7) and pelvic organ prolapse, urinary incontinence function questionnaire (PISQ-12) were compared between the two groups. Results: After 6 months of intervention, there was no significant difference in the muscle strength of type I muscle fibers between the two groups (Z=-0.918, P=0.358), while the muscle strength of type II muscle fibers in the observation group was significantly better than that in the control group (Z=-2.372, P=0.018). There was no significant difference in A3 reflex between the two groups before and after treatment (before: χ2=0.387, P=0.534; after: χ2=0.683, P=0.409). The POP-Q score of the observation group was significantly better than that of the control group (Z=-2.073, P=0.038). There was no significant difference in PFDI20, PFIQ7 and PISQ-12 scores between the two groups before and after treatment (P > 005). In the observation group, there were 2 cases of vaginal relaxation, 1 case of mild uterine prolapse, no stress urinary incontinence and vaginal wall bulge, the incidence was 4.84%. In the control group, 4 cases had vaginal relaxation, 2 cases had mild uterine prolapse, 1 case had stress urinary incontinence and no vaginal wall bulge, the incidence was 11.29%. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation biofeedback combined with family individualized pelvic floor rehabilitation training has a better effect on pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation, which is helpful to prevent the occurrence of PFD.
Keywords
Electrical Stimulation Biofeedback, Individualization, Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation Training, Postpartum, Pelvic Floor Dysfunction Disease
To cite this article
Huan Wang, Hong Zhou, Li Cheng, Preventive Effect of Electrical Stimulation Biofeedback Combined With Family Individualized Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation Training on Postpartum Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, Journal of Surgery. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 43-47. doi: 10.11648/j.js.20200802.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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