Volume 8, Issue 2, April 2020, Page: 76-80
Effect of a Seamless Device for Instillation on Bladder Instillation of Drug After Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor
Liu Qian, Department of Nursing, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Guo Xiaoxia, Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Received: Mar. 29, 2020;       Accepted: Apr. 16, 2020;       Published: Apr. 29, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.js.20200802.17      View  57      Downloads  39
Abstract
Objective: We aim to explore the effect of a seamless device for instillation on bladder instillation of drug after transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Methods: There were 24 patients undergoing transurethral resection of bladder tumor in the department of urinary surgery from January 2019 to December 2019, and 150 person-times of bladder instillation of drug in follow-up. We adopted random number table to averagely divide the 150 person-times into experimental group, control group A and control group B. In the experimental group, before bladder instillation of drug, a 50ml injector was used for dissolution and suction of drug. During instillation of drug, we used heparin cap to connect the injector and catheter to make a seamless device for instillation. In the control group A, before instillation, a 50ml injector was also used for dissolution and suction of drug, but at the same time, the syringe nozzle was inserted into the horn-shaped catheter orifice to inject the drug. In the control group B, we used a 50 ml injector for dissolution and suction of drug before instillation and then injected to drug into an aseptic bowel. After that, we used a 50 ml medical irrigator to draw in the liquid in the bowl and inserted the irrigator nozzle into the horn-shaped catheter orifice to inject the liquid. We compared operator’s satisfaction during instillation, drug leakage and time consumption between the three groups. Results: Operator’s satisfaction in the experimental group, control group A and control group B was 100%, 12% and 84% respectively and there was a significant difference in that between the three groups (χ2=57.576, P=0.000). In terms of drug leakage, there was no leakage in the experimental group, and an average of 11.44±2.13 ml of leakage in the control group A and an average of 0.77±1.14 ml of leakage in the control group B. The one-way analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference in that (F=1041.089, P=0.000). At last, the time consumption in the experimental group was 9.28±1.21min, and the control group A took the longest time 11.58±1.81 min. The one-way analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference in time consumption between the three groups (F=32.947, P=0.000). Conclusions: the self-designed seamless device for instillation in the bladder instillation of drug for patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor can not only ensure the dosage of drug, avoid iatrogenic exposure but also reduce time consumption and improve medical staff’s satisfaction. Hence, the seamless device is worth clinical application.
Keywords
Seamless Device for Instillation, Post-transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor, Bladder Instillation of Drug, Effect
To cite this article
Liu Qian, Guo Xiaoxia, Effect of a Seamless Device for Instillation on Bladder Instillation of Drug After Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor, Journal of Surgery. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 76-80. doi: 10.11648/j.js.20200802.17
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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