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Volume 8, Issue 4, August 2020, Page: 136-139
The First Implantation of the Novel Biological Heart Valve, the Inspiris Resilia Aortic Tissue Valve in Africa
Isaac Okyere, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Unit, Directorate of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana; School of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
Sanjeev Singh, School of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; Directorate of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
Perditer Okyere, School of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; Renal Unit, Directorate of Medicine, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
Baffoe Gyan, The National Cardiothoracic Centre, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana
Nana Addo Boateng, Directorate of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
Enoch Akowuah, James Cook University Hospital and South Tees NHS Foundation Trust, Middlesbrough, United Kingdom
Received: Jul. 3, 2020;       Accepted: Jul. 15, 2020;       Published: Aug. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.js.20200804.17      View  97      Downloads  43
Abstract
The durability of artificial bioprosthestic or tissue heart valves is limited by structural valve deterioration (SVD) due to long-term calcification especially in young patients and in Africa. A novel bioprosthestic valve, the Resilia Inspiris Aortic Tissue Valve has been developed which, in preclinical studies, has shown reduced calcification thus improving durability. The Inspiris Resilia Aortic Valve is a stented tri-leaflet valve made from bovine pericardial tissue. The tissue is created by treating bovine pericardial tissue with Edwards Integrity Preservation. It incorporates a stable capping anticalcification process, which blocks residual aldehyde groups known to bind with calcium. Tissue preservation with glycerol allows the valve to be stored without a traditional liquid-based solution, such as glutaraldehyde. Therefore, the valve is stored under dry packaging conditions and consequently does not require rinsing prior to implantation. The novel tissue preservation technology significantly improves hemodynamic and anticalcification properties compared with the standard artificial bioprosthestic aortic valve, the Perimount tissue valve. The experience of the implantation of this valve in Africa is limited for there seems to be no published experience of the behaviour of the implantation of this special long lasting bioprosthestic valve in Africa and therefore the purpose of this paper is to share our initial experience of the first successful implantation of this Inspiris Resilia Aortic Valve in Ghana, Africa. The implantation was done in a 57-year-old patient who presented with symptomatic moderate to severe aortic valve regurgitation with adequate left ventricular systolic function. He has been followed-up for a year now with well-healed wounds and a transthoracic echocardiography revealing a well-seated valve with no regurgitant flow or paravalvular leak. This is the first report describing the use of the new Inspiris Resilia Aortic valve which has increased durability and does not require anticoagulation in Africa as far as we know.
Keywords
Aortic Valve, Inspiris Resilia Aortic Valve, Open Heart Surgery, Bioprosthestic Valve
To cite this article
Isaac Okyere, Sanjeev Singh, Perditer Okyere, Baffoe Gyan, Nana Addo Boateng, Enoch Akowuah, The First Implantation of the Novel Biological Heart Valve, the Inspiris Resilia Aortic Tissue Valve in Africa, Journal of Surgery. Vol. 8, No. 4, 2020, pp. 136-139. doi: 10.11648/j.js.20200804.17
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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